Start a conversation

Types of NBN

There are many type of NBN, unfortunately you cannot choose your NBN, it will be a matter of what is available at your location, below is a explanation of the different types of NBN and how they work.

All types of NBN network connections that utilise a physical line running to the premises are considered fixed line connections.


FTTP (Fibre to the Premises)

An NBN Fibre to the Premises (FTTP) connection is used in circumstances where a fibre optic line will be run from the nearest available fibre node, directly to your premises.

FTTP connections require an NBN Network Termination Device (NTD) to be installed inside your home. This device requires power to operate and can only be installed by an approved NBN installer or phone and internet provider.


Fixed Wireless 

An NBN Fixed Wireless connection utilises data transmitted over radio signals to connect a premises to the NBN broadband access network. This connection is typically used in circumstances where the distance between premises can be many kilometres. Data travels from a transmission tower located as far as 14 kilometres, to an NBN outdoor antenna that has been fitted to the premises by an approved NBN installer.

Fixed Wireless connections also require an NBN connection box to be installed at the point where the cable from the NBN outdoor antenna enters your premises. This device requires power to operate, and can only be installed by an approved NBN installer or phone and internet provider.


FTTN (Fibre to the Node)

An NBN Fibre to the Node (FTTN) connection is utilised in circumstances where the existing copper phone and internet network from a nearby fibre node is used to make the final part of the connection to the NBN access network.

The fibre node is likely to take the form of a street cabinet. Each street cabinet will allow the NBN access network signal to travel over a fibre optic line from the exchange, to the cabinet, and connect with the existing copper network to reach your premises.

For the best experience, check your address and contact your preferred phone and internet provider about an NBN powered plan. It’s a good idea to ask about your options, as not all speeds are available at all premises.


FTTB (Fibre to the Building)

An NBN Fibre to the Building (FTTB) connection is generally used when we are connecting an apartment block or similar types of buildings to the NBN access network. In this scenario we run a fibre optic line to the fibre node in the building’s communications room, and then we use the existing technology in the building to connect to each apartment.


The fibre node is likely to take the form of a secure cabinet in your building’s communications room. Each cabinet will allow the nbn™ access network signal to travel over a fibre optic line, to the existing network technology present in the building.

For the best experience, check your address and contact your preferred phone and internet provider about an NBN powered plan. It’s a good idea to ask about your options, as not all speeds are available at all premises.


FTTC (Fibre to the Curb)

Fibre to the Curb is a new access technology that will form part of the NBN broadband access network rollout to provide access to broadband services to Australian homes and businesses.

An NBN FTTC connection is used in circumstances where fibre is extended close to your premises, connecting to a small Distribution Point Unit (DPU), generally located inside a pit on the street. From here, the existing copper network is connected to the fibre to form the final NBN connection. 

To power your FTTC service with electricity and provide your connection to theNBN broadband access network, an FTTC NBN Connection device will be required inside your home or business. In some cases, you may be eligible to perform self-installation of the NBN connection device. 


HFC (Hybrid Fibre Co-Axial) 

An NBN Hybrid Fibre Coaxial (HFC) connection is used in circumstances where the existing ‘pay TV’ or cable network can be used to make the final part of the NBN network connection. In this circumstance a HFC line will be run from the nearest available fibre node, to your premises.

Hybrid Fibre Coaxial (HFC) connections require an NBN network device to be installed at the point where the HFC line enters your home. This device requires power to operate, and can be installed by an approved NBN installer or service provider. 

HFC technology over the NBN network will help turn the cable networks built in the 1990s by Telstra and Optus into a substantially upgraded network that is designed to deliver access to fast broadband to end-users. 


Choose files or drag and drop files
Was this article helpful?
Yes
No
  1. Vonex Helpdesk

  2. Posted
  3. Updated

Comments